Research Study Finds Doctor's Biome Completely Inhibits C. diff

Research Study Finds Doctor's Biome Completely Inhibits C. diff

A research study published on August 8, 2020 in the Journal of Gastroenterology Research explores the use of Doctor's Biome in inhibiting the growth of Clostridium difficile (C. diff), a bacterium that causes life-threatening diarrhea.¹

This study was conducted by Dr. Howard Robins, Chief Medical Officer and Dr. Reza Kamarei, Chief Science and Technology Officer of Doctor's Biome.

Clostridium difficile colitis results from disruption of normal healthy bacteria in the colon, often from antibiotics. Symptoms of Clostridium difficile infection include diarrhea, loose or watery stools lasting for several days, fever, stomach tenderness, loss of appetite and nausea. 

Although this study focused on C. diff, the broader goal set out to be accomplished was to prove Doctor's Biome can be effective in rebalancing the gut microbiome, especially after taking antibiotics. 

There have been several studies that suggest the use of probiotics in C. diff infections but this particular study tests 5 strains of Bifidobacteria and 10 strains of Lactobacilli found in Doctor's Biome - these are patented strains sourced from Dupont Nutrition and Biosciences.  

This study found the complete absence of C. diff colony forming units due to the inhibitory effect of the bioactive compounds released in Doctor's Biome. 

The study suggests that the unique blend of probiotics and prebiotics in Doctor's Biome have functioned in a complementary, additive and possibly synergistic way to completely inhibit growth of C. diff.  

One of the most important bioactive compounds released was lactic acid, which creates the optimal environment for the probiotics to flourish and unfavorable for C. diff, the harmful bacteria to grow. Lactic acid lowers the pH, which increases the acidity similar to the harsh environment of the digestive system.

The patented strains of probiotics or "smart bacteria" used in the study were created to survive the stomach up to 85% of the time. The smart bacteria is able to attach to the cell wall of the GI tract, and change the environment making it nearly impossible for C. diff to propagate and exist.

The extraordinary results of this study are not absolute and much more research needs to done but it does show the remarkable potential of probiotics to be used in a clinical setting.

The team at Doctor's Biome is excited to pave the way for the innovation of probiotics and to continue to conduct more research in this field. 

Source

1. https://scholars.direct/Articles/gastroenterology/jgr-4-020.php?jid=gastroenterology&rjnrid=d6pa8DK